About your Search

20130201
20130209
STATION
CSPAN 19
MSNBCW 9
MSNBC 8
CSPAN2 3
KNTV (NBC) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WETA 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 58
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)
is president obama really cares about the deficit. if there is something he noticed in the first two years when the economic crisis had to be front and center, the thing he wanted to deal with was the long-run deficit. the idea that he went on a spending binge if you don't make threats like that is crazy. the evidence is there that he put spending cuts on the table. he asked them for them to be paired with tax increases as well. there is more good will than people realize. more agreement that we have such a big budget problem that will we're going to fire on all cylinders. we have to cut spending. frankly, we have raise more revenue. >> you're listening to the california program and our speakers are economic experts. we are discussing national, regional, and global economic challenges. you can find video online. there's a series of questions around employment and job growth. what what is your outlook on job growth? >> i will start. i think -- i will say i was here last year and i'm more optimistic this year than last year. we made a significant amount of progress. it looks like housing prices h
really needed was deficit reduction. and this is a period in which we didn't come to a big deficit reduction deal. what we did is raise taxes. it cut the deficit a bit, but not a big deal. what happened to the markets? somehow we kept adding jobs and the stock market did really well. it all worked out reasonably okay. so here is what we learned. cutting government spending hurts economic growth. no doubt about it. that means doing it in a bad economy may not be such a good idea. but increasing taxes a bit, not coming to the big deficit deal. the private sector and even the markets don't seem all that concerned. the last week should cause a lot of people in washington to re-think what they're doing. i am not optimistic that will happen. joining me now, former economic adviser to vice president joe biden, jared bernstein, a man who is always re-thinking what he is doing, how are you? >> i'm fine, ezra. >> and what else did you see in the reports? you got a good eye, what caught yours? >> one thing i saw was the revisions to last year's employment growth was such that i thought we wer
people like laura tyson writing columns calling for the need for a plan for faster growth, not deficit reduction. what is the president -- i know you've talked about how all the president's plans envision job creation, but what does the president tell his advisors when he sees these signs of a sluggish recovery? what is he asking in the way of things to speed recovery, create jobs and stimulate growth? >> i'll go to the narrow question first. every time the president meets with his economic advisors to discuss policy proposals and refinements to existing policies, the focus is on job creation and economic growth. and that includes when we have discussions about deficit reduction. as i've said many times and as the president has made clear, deficit reduction is not a goal unto itself. it is a means to, if done right , the desired goal, which is greater growth and greater job creation. as part of an overall economic policy. i would note that today's jobs figures and the revisions that we saw in previous months' jobs figures mean that over 35 months we have created 6.1 million private sec
with some of my republican friends is that we'rewe all want to fix the deficit problem. there is no question. but i think, when they have a chance to look at this bill and understand what we're really facing, i don't think we will have a problem. >> how is this different from the proposal from a year ago? >> did we have a pay freeze a year ago? [laughter] >> it is different. the house had the attrition of the workforce that is in this component. we had a combination -- instead of every three positions that came open. we had two. and a combination of overall across the federal government over a year. this is different here it combines both so we're on the same page. and we have the house proposal on nutrition and we added congressional pay freeze on it. >> what makes you think this time around that the senate majority leader will take up this proposal? >> i would certainly defer to the chairman, but there is a real urgency here. one of the reasons that the president and the administration, during this campaign, didn't want the actual warrant act, the law that requires to notify workers that t
apiece saying how the trust deficit is hurting the economy. what are you trying to say about that? guest: we usually do not talk about trust deficits. talk about trade, budget deficits, things we can measure. i'm talking about a breakdown of trust in american society, in particular in the institutions that make our economy go. when you look at measures of trust from surveys like a gallup or the pugh institute -- the pew institute, or even newspapers, congress, large corporations, banks, public schools, they have all been going down for many years. for a lot of them, this decline in trust was intensified leading up to and going into the financial crisis. there are a lot of reasons for these things we can talk about. what we were trying to get at in the story that -- is that this matters to the economy, and trust breaks down. there was nobel prize-winning economist who 40 years ago said that every commercial transaction has within it an element of trust. when you trust your counter party, you're more likely to engage in a transaction. when trust begins to fray, and people become suspicious
street journal," chief economic correspondent. welcome. you wrote a piece saying how the trust deficit is hurting the economy. what we're trying to do? >> guest: we usually talk about things but budget deficits and trade deficits with things we can measure. what i'm talking about is the breakdown of trust in american society. it would take her in institutions that make our economy go. when you look at measures of trust from surveys by gallup for the pew institute that americans have, it's a very important institution including the media newspaper, television, congress, banks, large corporations, public school, public union. if all been going down for many years and allowed them, declining interest intensified leading up to and going into the financial crisis and there's a lot of reasons for the things we can talk about. but what were chained to get out of the story is this matters economy but trust breaks down. a nobel prize-winning economist named kenneth arrow for 40 years ago set every commercial transaction hasn't been a bad element of trust when you trust your counterparty come ne
with a record debt and deficit, threat of global warming, threat of global poverty, of pandemics, of national security challenges like continuing war on terrorism, the instability of iran and north korea, rising powers, turmoil across the middle east, turmoil in north africa, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the growing threat of cyberattacks. how we confront these problems, how we deal with these challenges will in many ways determine that future course of america. it will determine whether the united states will be a leader in the 21st century or whether we will be just another failed empire in history. to succeed we will depend on the resilience of our economy, the strength of our diplomatic and military institutions and above all, the effectiveness of our political system that underpins in many ways what we do as a country. and that brings me to what i see as perhaps the most urgent task facing this nation and facing all of us and that is overcoming the partisan dysfunction in congress that poses a threat to our quality of life, to our national security, to our economy
the deficit. all by honoring the wish of 2/3 of americans to respect states' rights for marijuana just like we do for alcohol. i would invite my colleagues to join this effort in developing a marijuana policy that makes sense for america today. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from north carolina, mr. coble, for five minutes. mr. coble: i thank the speaker. mr. speaker, january is the traditional month in which new year's resolutions are developed. i'm suggesting that president obama and mrs. boim adopt a resolution -- mrs. obama adopt a resolution. it appears to me, mr. speaker, regard air force one very casually and i believe on some occasions two planes, at least two planes go to the same destination. air force one, mr. speaker, belongs to president and mrs. obama. but air force one also belongs to the american taxpayer. and i would welcome a new year's resolution that would provide generous lace of all future air force one dispatches with prudence, discipline and last but certainly not least fiscal austerity. america's taxpayers will be
to lower the devers, but americans do not -- to lower the deficit, but americans do not support sacrificing real spenged cuts for more tax hikes. the president's sequester should be replaced with spending cuts and reforms that put us on a path to balance a budget over the next 10 years. the american people believe that the tax question has been settled. they know the president called for a balanced approach to the debt. combination of revenues and spending cuts, and they know he's gotten his revenue. the american people do not believe the president will use further tax revenues to lower the debt. and haven't seen this president attempt to spend his way into prosperity over the last four years, they know he'll spend it. the president doesn't believe we have a spending problem. he general winly believes the government -- genuinely believes the government spending causes economic growth. if that were true, the economy today would be thriving. it isn't thriving. the unemployment rate is still nearly 8% and rising. small businesses like the one i ran are struggling. middle class families, those
times" economist argued why the u.s. should spend now and worry about deficit reduction later. here it is. >> dashing spending when you still have depressed economy is really destructive. it's probably even counterproductive even in purely fiscal terms. we should be sustaining government spending until we have a stronger economic recovery. >> this is not a hard call. as long as we have 4 million people who have been unemployed for more than a year, this is not a time to be worrying about reducing the budget deficit. give me something that looks more like a normal employment situation and i'll become a deficit hawk but not now. >> do you subscribe to that, jared? or is that too extreme? >> not at all. i think paul's exactly right. paul and i share the following thing. we're deficit doves in a down economy, and deficit hawks in a strong economy. at a time like this, what you really need is faster growth. by the way, not only will that help put more people to work, but it will actually help reduce your budget deficit ironically because those people will be working, paying taxes, they w
gdp calculation rises, government versus consumption plus investment and minus your trade deficit, right? so if it's not going to consumption and it's going into the pockets of the top 1% or whatever, why aren't we seeing that reflected in investment? in fact, we saw very good business and investment numbers in the latest economic data. where are those dollars disappearing to? >> people invest when there's no return. >> excess capacity, you're not going to build more excess capacity just because the fed has low interest rates. i mean, if you look at investment overall, before the crisis, about 40% of all investment was in real estate. now, that is going to be damp dampened just because we built too many houses. >> and we had a bust, right? >> and we had a bust. the good news was a lot of them were showedly built and they'll fall apart and we'll have to reconstruct them. >> thank heavens. >> but the fact is, we overbuilt. the other part is actually not doing badly, given how weak demand is. it's not a lack of money. it's not the weaknesses in our financial system. that was one of t
out of washington to get our deficits under control. hopefully, we do not have to many quarters where we end up in negative territory. this is not an economy growing six percent and can hinder those bibles easily. host: magnolia, texas, david, better. caller: [indiscernible]we are doing great here. i noticed the super bowl is forming dollars per minute. everything is packed. all of the football stadiums. i do not see any recession. host: you said you are doing better why? caller: i live 15 miles from where they are building the number one country in the world. we are getting roads. it is unbelievable around here. we have job signs everywhere. as far as the savings, when interest rates are 1.5%, who will put their money in the bank? bernanke wants you to put it in stocks. that is why there is no interest rate. i took my money for years ago when i bought those rifles. i have made so much money on them. it is unbelievable. host: he mentioned social security. there is a category about the social safety net. guest: we use the term government social benefits to cover quite a few different p
and the deficit and debt crisis, everyone is entrenched in their positions and sitting back and saying, i think sequestration is going to happen. you know who is going to take the brunt of it. the across the board nature of the cuts are going to hurt our ability to train and maintain, vehicles, ships and airplanes and the things that provide the readiness for our military are going to take a dramatic cut and we'll have done nothing to reform the way we spend money and put our country on a sound physical track. >> of course, pete, as we talk about cutting back, our enemies are ramping up and you see north korea doing more testing and iran moving possibly closer to nuclear weapons. do our enemies overseas pay attention to our budget woes and our plans here at home? >> sure they do. they look at our capabilities. they look at our disposition. they perceive us differently when we're perceived to be drawing back and pulling away from the world and cutting our capability. so, what happens in washington is watched very, very closely and that's why we have to demonstrate our commitment to maintaining t
this about reducing the deficit. >> there is no dow that we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. we can do it in a gradual way so it does not have a huge impact. the average person cannot take advantage of them. they do not have access to cayman islands account. the average person does not have access to carried interest income. melissa: i do not know, how do you interpret that. that sounds like the tax man is coming. lori: we have been talking about eliminating loopholes and tax deductions for a while. melissa: we have not done it. lori: right. but it is not a new proposal to the people. melissa: he tries to hide behind the wealthy people. it is coming for everybody. anyway, fighting back. we will introduce you to a man training the troops fighting the cyber war. lori: what happened last night. the super bowl in the dark for 33 minutes. we will shed some light on the situation. ♪ i'm a conservative investor. but that doesn't mean i don't want to make money. i love making money. i try to be smart with my investments. i als
into further deficit and debt. >> obviously democrats would prefer a longer suspension of he debt ceiling which would provide additional economic security and stability as we continue to find ways to decrease the deficit. raising the possibility that the u.s. could default its obligations every few months is not an ideal way to run government but a short term solution is better than another imminent manufactured crisis. >> holman: the house already passed the bill. without it, the government would default on its obligations as early as mid-february. in economic news, americans' personal income grew in december, by the most in eight years. but first-time claims for jobless benefits were up last week. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 50 points to close at 13,860. the nasdaq fell a fraction of a point to close at 3,142. blinding snowfall and a slick freeway triggered a mile-long series of crashes in detroit today. at least three people were killed and 20 more injured. the pileups left a section of interstate 75 littered with wrecked cars and big-rig trucks. th
the economy and put us on a sustainable budget, bring our deficits down in a responsible, balanced way. >> does the president -- considering what the defense cuts did to the contraction of the u.s. economy in the fourth quarter, dois the president goi to be more aggressive in trying to find a way to stop the so-called sequester, the automatic defense cuts that would go through, which could it looks like now -- we already know the economic impact defense cuts have had last quarter. these would obviously slow down the economy even more. is the president going to refocus on this. >> the president has been focused on this for some time. the president made a submission to the super committee a year ago or so, which would have reduced our deficits in a balanced way, eliminated the sequester and his negotiations with the congress on the fiscal cliff. he did the same thing. so this is something that the president has provided a plan. the sequester is bad policy. it's something that we should eliminate. it wasn't intended to take place. and we got a taste for the impact that the sequester might
references to the trust deficit that has at times existed between this committee and the cia. if i'm confirmed, the address the deficit between the committee and the cia would be wholly unacceptable and i would make it my goal on day one of my tenure and every day thereafter to strengthen the trust between us. i have a reputation for speaking my mind, and at times doing so in a direct manner, which some attribute to my new jersey routes. -- roots. i would like to think that my candor would reassure you that you'll get straight answers from me, maybe not always those you will like, but you will get answers and they will reflect my honest views. that is the commitment i made to you. i would like to finish by saying a few words about the importance of taking care of the women and men who serve in the cia. because the of the secretiveness that the intelligence work requires, few americans will ever know the making sacrifices that these professionals and their families make every day. many have risked their lives and at times have given their lives to keep our country states. -- safe. i
a chart yesterday that the deficit has already fallen from $1 trillion to $648 billion with the cuts they did in 2011. as far as taxes, they need to change the tax code. businesses need to pay their fair share. i get $22,000 in my civil service and social security. i paid $448 in taxes last year. i am 76 years old. i am barely surviving. host: you mentioned at the beginning that your daughter-in- law, where she employed with a company that depended on government financing? >> yes, some government contracts, so they froze things to try to save jobs and then last friday they laid off five people. -- they froze hiring. host: willie is with us on the line. caller: i look at it like this, when you have a drought, in order to break the drought, everybody has to pay for it. a storm, you have to have a hurricane or a tornado to break a drought. some people are going to get flooded out. so i hope that it will go through. let it do what it is supposed to do and get this stuff straightened out. everybody's looking out for themselves. i worked for general motors. the only thing that got general
additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way so it doesn't have a huge impact. >> the republican leadership saying flatly, no more tax hikes. >> so they're all dug in again on the fiscal issues. if you look at the polls, wolf, the public wants the president and congress to tackle those fiscal issues. ironically, they may be closer on gun control. they may be closer on immigration reform. but it's still the fiscal issues that are the real problem. >> in the next few week, they have some major things coming up on those issues. dan pfeiffer, the president's senior adviser, will join us in the next hour to discuss guns, guns and guns. >>> the nation's new secretary of state's wasting no time getting down to business. john kerry spent a busy weekend on the phone with palestinian and israeli leader, plus officials in japan, south korea and turkey. all that was before he officially said hello to the state department staff today. >> here's the big question before the country and the world and the state department aft
and deficit debate is harmful to the business environment now? >> the uncertainty is back. the amount of -- the uncertainty is bad. you go from the fiscal cliff to the deficit debate to sequestration. that is inherently disruptive to business investment. certainty is a good multiplier. we are these long cycle businesses that have global competition. i do not have the lecture he to say that i will quit investing for six months until this is reserved. -- resolved. i will keep going. the people who can hurt the worst by all of this are the small and medium businesses. the people that have no buffer. that get confused. these are the people that are the heart of the u.s. economy. they are the ones that are constantly being bombarded as we go from one to another. this can only be solved here. this is one of the few cases where the business roundtable of people speak with one voice. it would be great to get a resolution. >> there is a divide in the corporate side on the corporate tax front. large companies would benefit more from corporate tax reform, especially going to a territorial system
campaign will affect legislative fights in the 20 -- in the next congress. and my trust deficit ports government and the financial sector has impeded. economic recovery. -- impeded the economic recovery. than a look at american spending and savings habits. and savings habits.
they have previously accepted to help limit layoffs during record budget deficits. city leaders indicated they would support modest raises but the police officer association argued bigger raises are needed to keep the officers from leaving the department. the union has also called for opening negotiations to the public. >> the boy scouts of america could vote soon on whether to lit a policy that excludes gay members and leaders at the headquarters in texas. the proposal would allow individual troops to decide how to address the issue. a conservative group in texas organized a prayer vigil for this morning. the organization is expected to issue a statement today either way. >> the nasdaq exchange could be paying millions over facebook's botched initial public offering. the "wall street journal" reports that nasdaq is in talks with the government to pay $5 million in penalties, only 1 percent of the money lost by brokers and investors. last may, on the morning of the i.p.o. technical problems delayed the trading of the facebook shares and the nasdaq is offering to compensate customers $62 m
a $16 trillion deficit, 51 million people on food stamps. our culture is an entitlement culture and yet we're going after 13 million people who have an immigration problem. hey, i'm all for vetting them. how about reverse discrimination for once in this country. if we're going to demand exceptionalism, we should have it towards the immigrants whether they come legally or illegally and also go back to americans who are u.s. citizens. >> are you talking about expelling americans? >> i'm all for demotion of citizenship. i agree with you. it may be extreme. but here's my point. how many of you. >> keep it short. >> how many of you have a trouble in a third world country and you come back to america and have a different experience about exceptionalism. what about reverse immigration? >> i do not support the deportation of american citizens but if that were to be a policy, what you would do is save hundreds of billions of dollars a year in the welfare state because immigrants are less likely to use welfare each when naturalized and americans who are poor. that's an interesting result of that.
one with budget deficits. immigration is not what hurts them, and it is not standing in the way of aiding them. in 2007, the congressional budget office found that legalizing undocumented immigrants would increase revenue by $48 billion, while costing only $3 billion increased public services. and that is before you get into the broader economic benefits. there are very few free lunches in public policy. usually it is a realm of hard choices, but taking advantage of our unique position as the country with the world's best and brightest, desperately a way to go? that is surely correct. >>> the pain of mccain. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. why is john mccain so angry? 40 years after the vietnam p.o.w.s came home, the most famous of them is angrier than ever. why is america, why are we fighting the vietnam war all over again in the united states senate? the ticked off vitriol against chuck hagel, what is it about? is it for show? is it about something hagel said in the cloakroom? is it the unfairness of vietnam itself, that
worked together to reduce our deficit by $2.5 trillion. that is a good start, but to get the rest of the way, we need a balanced set of reforms. for example, we need to lower the cost of health care like programs like medicare. we cannot pass the burden. these reforms must go hand-in- hand with eliminating excess spending in our tax code so that the wealthiest cannot take advantage of loopholes and reductions that are not available to most americans. 2013 can be a year of solid growth and more jobs and higher wages. everyone in washington needs to focus on what is right for the country, on what is right for you and your families. that is how we will get our economy moving faster. it will strengthen our middle class. we will build a country that rewards the effort and determination of every single american. thank you. have a great weekend. >> hello. my name is susan brooks. it is a pleasure to speak to you from my home state on indiana. my husband and i have raised two children here. i've been a u.s. attorney for this area and starting last month, one of the state voices in the u.s
of our deficit. without just passing the burden off to seniors. these reforms must go hand-in- hand with eliminating excess ending in our tax code, though that the wealthiest individuals and biggest corporations cannot take advantage of loopholes and deductionsnew york not billable to most americans. 2013 can be a year of solid growth, more jobs, and higher wages. that will only happen if we put a stop to self-inflicted wounds in washington. everyone in washington needs to focus, not on politics, but on what is right for the country. what is right for you and your families. that is how we will get our economy growing faster, strengthen our middle class, and how we will build a country that rewards the effort and determination of every single american. thanks. have a great weekend. >> hello, my name is susan brooks. it is a pleasure to speak to you from hamilton county in my home state of indiana. i have lived in indiana just about all my life. i have been david and i have raised two children here. i have been a u.s. attorney for this area, and starting last month one of the hoosier
who has worked with budgets throughout my life, in order to deal with the deficit problem, you've got to deal with entitlements. you have to deal with revenues. and you have to deal with discretionary. all of it has to be part of a package. >> is he doing enough? >> i think he's pushing as hard as he can. >> should he be more public? >> well, look. the president of the united states has indicated the concern about sequester. he's indicated his concern about maintaining a strong national defense. and he's proposed a solution to this. the ball is in congress' court. they have got to take action to delay sequester. >> i want to move on to some of the hot spots. we'll start in north africa. a lot of news this week. here is the a.p. headline. u.s. limited in fight against north african militants. the united states is struggling to confront an uptick in threats in the newest hot spot with limited intelligence and few partners to help as the obama administration weighs who you to keep islamic extremists from jeopardizing national security without launching war. we want to put up a map here.
in the right direction. but midway through that cut that back and went back to spending cuts and deficit reductions. critics say basically if they would have left it alone, if they would have left the economy alone it would have righted its own ship. the massive government spending of world war ii, that sucked a lot of people back into labor market at a terrible humanitarian cost got the economy back running. host: there have been some folks, part of the administration, part of the democrats that say infusing money and coming up with these stimulus projects will help get the economy going. is this a similar situation to what f.d.r. tried to do coming out of the great depression? guest: threrp definitely parallels between the stimulus law of 2009 and what f.d.r. wanted to do. one major difference was where the stimulus sort of relied on the private sector. they had is civilian conservation core. this time they've tried to put money into contracts that private firms will get and then hopefully hire private workers. i think the thing about the stimulus is i bet 80 years from now we'll be de
of this administration is the lack of priority and funding for the military. while they've increased the deficit by $5.3 trillion in four years, the only major part of the budget has been decreased is the military. that's something pretty well- known. a lot of people don't like that idea. the thing that bothers me just as much is putting the agenda, another agenda under the military budget. for example, you have heard senator mccain and me and others talk about the fact that the navy paid for 450,000 gallons of fuel, some $26 a gallon. you can get it on the market for $3. the air force, same thing. except it's $59 a gallon. and so the question i would have of you is just a commitment that if you are confirmed, will you confine the dollars that we are going to spend in the defense budget for defense purposes, for war-fighting purposes? >> well, of course i will because that's the intent of our budget and department of defense. >> i appreciate that very much. there was an article the other day in "the washington post" by jennifer ruben called, "our dim witted state department." it's kind of an interesti
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)